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Shake & Stir

 

Shake & Stir

Shake & Stir was one of the winners in the packaging category of the Flux 2017 Student Design Competition

Shake & Stir is a (theoretical) cocktail subscription service that I designed. It provides people with everything they need each month to make and learn about a new drink. Everything comes packaged for you in small bottles with just enough to make a few drinks, and the whole set comes with one piece of equipment each month. 

 

What sets Shake & Stir apart from the rest is the element of education. 

 

The Brand

Developing this brand identity was difficult for me, because initially, I didn't have a clear direction or anything setting my brand apart, aside from the nebulous idea that it was better than the competition. 

After starting down the path of the unspecific brand that is better than the competition, but not for any particular reason, I realized I needed to refocus. I returned to what set Shake & Stir apart from the competition, which was an emphasis on educating subscribers about the drinks they were making, and the ingredients they were made with. Once I had determined which parts of the brand and the service were important, I was able to regroup and (gasp!) start over. 

 

I returned to what set Shake & Stir apart from the competition, which was an emphasis on educating subscribers about the drinks they were making, and the ingredients they were made with. This is what I wanted to communicate with the look and feel of the brand.

 
A pattern to be used on packaging elements.

A pattern to be used on packaging elements.


The Deliverable

Though I spent a lot of time developing my brand and design elements for this project, the identity itself was not my main deliverable. The deliverable of my project was the packaging and the box itself, which I made totally from scratch. 

The Box

I knew I wanted the box to be easy to use, and fit together effortlessly, and in order to customize it to the exact specifications of my bottles, that meant making it myself. I screen printed the boxes to customize them. All of this construction and production meant a lot of trial and error.

 
Me, with just a few of the iterations of boxes that I cut, put together, and screen printed myself.

Me, with just a few of the iterations of boxes that I cut, put together, and screen printed myself.

 
My less-than-perfect first attempts at screen printing.

My less-than-perfect first attempts at screen printing.

The final product

The final product

I laser cut two layers of inserts that held everything in place for shipping. 

I laser cut two layers of inserts that held everything in place for shipping. 

The Labels

I used a couple of main design elements for the labels for my ingredient packaging - patterns, made of icons showing each ingredient, and type, which was bold and sharp in contrast with my main brand elements. The bottles themselves are simple, and meant to make the ingredients as approachable and simple as possible. 

Patterns for outer packaging

Patterns for outer packaging

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The Booklet

The booklet that contained the recipe and information about each ingredient was an important part of each package. You can check it out in full below:

The Final Deliverable

My final packaging. The outer box was hand cut and printed, the inner inserts were laser cut, and I digitally printed and attached all of the labels and tags for the ingredients.

My final packaging. The outer box was hand cut and printed, the inner inserts were laser cut, and I digitally printed and attached all of the labels and tags for the ingredients.

 
 

Check out an even more detailed account of my process below: